Ask me anything

Taj. Spinster. Unemployable film and tv editor. Translator of books. Singer of songs. Waster of time. Dreamer.

photos // the craft (1994) + jawbreaker (1999) + mean girls (2004)

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17 hours ago
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antipahtico:

Titania | Romeo and Juliet | Oedipus | Daedal | Europa | Apolonas and Dafni

Svetlin Vassilev

(Source: art-and-fury, via diodellamorte)

1 day ago
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theclotheshorse:

Katrin Thormann By Koto Bolofo For Numéro #157 October 2014

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1 day ago
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hoodratzayn:

i believe in hate at first sight

(Source: jadethrwall, via tragicallydelicious)

1 day ago
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british-history:

Henry IV Becomes King of England
30 September 1399
Henry IV became King of England when he deposed Richard II on this day in British history, 30 September 1399. Henry and Richard were first cousins who were close during their childhood, and when Richard II became king in 1377, Henry remained close with him to the point of being granted titles by him. The years of 1397–1399, however, saw several events the ruined their relationship, culminating in Richard II inexplicably disinheriting Henry after exiling him from England.While Richard was on campaign in Ireland, Henry and Thomas Arundel, former Archbishop of Canterbury, returned to England and began a military campaign of their own. Henry quickly gained enough power and support to have himself declared King Henry IV, imprison King Richard (who died in prison under mysterious circumstances) and bypass Richard’s seven-year-old heir-presumptive, Edmund de Mortimer. Much of Henry IV’s following reign was marked by the repeated uprising of the nobles, but he managed to effectively consolidate his power, despite his reign’s fiscal and administrative weaknesses.

british-history:

Henry IV Becomes King of England

30 September 1399

Henry IV became King of England when he deposed Richard II on this day in British history, 30 September 1399. Henry and Richard were first cousins who were close during their childhood, and when Richard II became king in 1377, Henry remained close with him to the point of being granted titles by him. The years of 1397–1399, however, saw several events the ruined their relationship, culminating in Richard II inexplicably disinheriting Henry after exiling him from England.

While Richard was on campaign in Ireland, Henry and Thomas Arundel, former Archbishop of Canterbury, returned to England and began a military campaign of their own. Henry quickly gained enough power and support to have himself declared King Henry IV, imprison King Richard (who died in prison under mysterious circumstances) and bypass Richard’s seven-year-old heir-presumptive, Edmund de Mortimer. Much of Henry IV’s following reign was marked by the repeated uprising of the nobles, but he managed to effectively consolidate his power, despite his reign’s fiscal and administrative weaknesses.

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1 day ago
102 notes